Eye Conditions

Blepharitis

What is Blepharitis?

Blepharitis is an inflammation of the eyelids that causes redness, itching and dry eye symptoms, including watery eye.

It can be caused by several diseases and conditions, and usually affects both eyes.

Often a chronic condition, it is an irritating problem that can be unsightly and cause discomfort but it is not contagious.

Blepharitis is not generally a threat to vision, and responds well to conscientious eyelid cleaning and hygiene techniques.

What are the symptoms?

The main symptoms of blepharitis are typically more intense in the morning and include:

  • Watery eyes / excessive tears
  • Redness and swelling
  • Gritty, burning or stinging sensation
  • Sensitivity to light and wind
  • Crusty or sticky eyelashes
  • Eyelids that appear greasy
  • Itchy eyelids and flaking of the skin around the eyes
  • Blurred vision that usually improves with blinking

What is Blepharitis?

Blepharitis is an inflammation of the eyelids that causes redness, itching and dry eye symptoms, including watery eye.

It can be caused by several diseases and conditions, and usually affects both eyes.

Often a chronic condition, it is an irritating problem that can be unsightly and cause discomfort but it is not contagious.

Blepharitis is not generally a threat to vision, and responds well to conscientious eyelid cleaning and hygiene techniques.

What are the symptoms?

The main symptoms of blepharitis are typically more intense in the morning and include:

  • Watery eyes / excessive tears
  • Redness and swelling
  • Gritty, burning or stinging sensation
  • Sensitivity to light and wind
  • Crusty or sticky eyelashes
  • Eyelids that appear greasy
  • Itchy eyelids and flaking of the skin around the eyes
  • Blurred vision that usually improves with blinking

Blepharitis: Overview

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Causes and Treatment

Most cases of blepharitis are associated with an excess of skin bacteria on your eyelids at the base of your eyelashes.

 

Other causes can include: seborrheic dermatitis (dandruff of the scalp and eyebrows), clogged or irritated oil glands in your eyelids, rosacea of the face, allergies, contact lens solutions, eye makeup, Demodex infestations (eyelash mites or lice) or dry eye syndrome.

 

As it is usually a chronic condition, daily self-care hygiene measures to keep your eyelids clean, and the application of regular warm compresses may be the best treatment.

 

If the symptoms persist, other standard treatments that may be recommended include lid massage, eye lubrication, eye antibiotic and steroid creams and occasionally, oral antibiotics.

Lid Hygiene: Warm Compress

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How to Apply Eye Drops

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