Eye Conditions

Fuchs Endothelial Dystrophy

What is Fuchs Endothelial Dystrophy?

Fuchs Endothelial Dystrophy, or cloudy cornea, is a condition in which fluid builds up in the clear outer covering of your eye (cornea).

The build up of fluid occurs when the endothelium cells inside the eye fail to pump it out, causing your cornea to swell and thicken leading to blurred or cloudy vision.

This condition usually affects both eyes and can cause your vision to gradually worsen over years.

What are the symptoms?

The most common symptom of early to moderate Fuchs Endothelial Dystrophy is blurred, hazy or cloudy vision in the morning that gradually improves throughout the day.

Other symptoms can include:

  • Blurred, hazy or cloudy vision (as the condition advances this may last all day long)
  • Light sensitivity
  • Glare and halos around lights
  • Pain or grittiness from tiny blisters of water on the surface of your cornea

What is Fuchs Endothelial Dystrophy?

Fuchs Endothelial Dystrophy, or cloudy cornea, is a condition in which fluid builds up in the clear outer covering of your eye (cornea).

The build up of fluid occurs when the endothelium cells inside the eye fail to pump it out, causing your cornea to swell and thicken leading to blurred or cloudy vision.

This condition usually affects both eyes and can cause your vision to gradually worsen over years.

What are the symptoms?

The most common symptom of early to moderate Fuchs Endothelial Dystrophy is blurred, hazy or cloudy vision in the morning that gradually improves throughout the day.

Other symptoms can include:

  • Blurred, hazy or cloudy vision (as the condition advances this may last all day long)
  • Light sensitivity
  • Glare and halos around lights
  • Pain or grittiness from tiny blisters of water on the surface of your cornea

What causes Fuchs Endothelial Dystrophy?

In most cases, Fuchs Endothelial Dystrophy is inherited and risk factors that increase your likelihood of developing the disease include:

  • Gender – more common in women than in men
  • Genetics / Family History
  • Age – typically the disease starts in the 30s and 40s, with symptoms developing later in life
  • Smoking
  • Diabetes

Treatment of Fuchs Endothelial Dystrophy

There is no cure for Fuchs Endothelial Dystrophy but in early to moderate stages of the disease, eye drops or ointments can be used to reduce swelling in the cornea.

In advanced cases, a corneal transplant via endothelial keratoplasty may be needed to clear vision by removing the unhealthy endothelial cells and replacing them with healthy tissue taken from a donor.

An Overview of Fuchs Endothelial Dystrophy

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